Conference :: New Brunswick and St. Thomas

The Canadian Society for the Study of Higher Education (CSSHE) will hold its annual conference at The University of New Brunswick and St. Thomas University in Fredericton, New Brunswick from Monday, 30 May until Wednesday, 1 June 2011 within the Congress of the Humanities and Social Sciences. Website for registration, accommodation, delegate services is http://www.congress2011.ca
Conference Proceedings

A guide on how to upload papers and presentation materials is available here [English] or here [Français].

To view or upload presentations please visit CSSHE at OCS.


Partial Travel Reimbursement


Form


Conference Programme


Programme | Programme : 11 May 2011 – Le 11 mai 2011
Programme | Programme : 5 May 2011 – Le 5 mai 2011
Tentative programme | Programme provisoire : 14 April 2011 – Le 14 avril 2011
Tentative programme | Programme provisoire : 6 April 2011 – Le 6 avril 2011


Organized Sessions


Version française : Sessions thématiques du congrès 2011 de la SCÉES

The Canadian Society for the Study of Higher Education (CSSHE) will hold its annual conference at the University of New Brunswick in Fredericton, New Brunswick from Monday, 30 May until Wednesday, 1 June 2011 within the Congress of the Humanities and Social Sciences.

This is a call for paper proposals to be included in Organized Paper Sessions. Below is a description of each session and the name and e-mail address of each organizer.

Session organizers are now accepting proposals for their sessions. The due date for papers to be submitted to session organizers is 28 February 2011. Session organizers will receive paper proposals, make selections from the proposals and organize the session, and serve as session chairs and discussants at the conference. Potential presenters must submit a title and an extended abstract of their paper (not to exceed 1500 words) to the appropriate session organizer directly. Organizers are strongly encouraged to include at least one student paper presentation in their sessions. If you are a student, please identify yourself as such to the session organizers.

ORGANIZER: Malama Tsimenis (Toronto)
malama.tsimenis@utoronto.ca
TITLE: Transforming educational experiences into opportunities for shaping engaged citizens
The rising tuition fees, the pursuit of professional specialization and the institutionalized compartmentalization of the educational experience have exacerbated the student-as-consumer phenomenon, shaping an attitude toward learning and an approach toward teaching which often do not comply with the spirit of a broad and meaningful education. On the other hand, the results of the 2010 National Survey of Student Engagement speak loud and clear: students benefit the most from experiences where “what [they] know becomes a part of who they are” (2010 NSSE). The proposed session would focus on curriculum design initiatives that explicitly incorporate this approach to teaching and learning, and more specifically on initiatives aimed at instilling in students a strong sense of civic engagement as an integral part of their educational experience.

ORGANIZER: Alyson King (UOIT)
alyson.king@uoit.ca
TITLE: A university in the making: The voices of UOIT
Dr. Gary Polonsky: “From Inspiration to Creation: The Founding of a University”
Dr. Shirley Van Nuland: “Starting from Scratch: Teaching as the Lecture Halls Grow”
Dr. Alyson King: “Students at Work and Play: Creating a Student Culture in a New University”.
The Voices of UOIT research project documents the founding and early years of the University of Ontario Institute of Technology (UOIT). This project is based on a collection of oral history interviews with those present during the founding and early years of the university and examines the strategies used to establish a successful new university. As the first new Ontario university of the 21st century and one of only four new universities created since 1965, UOIT is becoming a significant achievement in the history of higher education. The mandate of the university was to become a premier technology-oriented and professionally-based university. UOIT has grown beyond expectation in terms of student population (over 7,000 students in 2010-11), programs and degrees offered (26 different degrees), and research agendas (worth over $34 million since opening). Although significant achievements have been made, the rapid growth and innovative agenda of the university has led to challenges particular to universities in the 21st century. With the potential and the mandate to be innovative, has UOIT been able to shrug off the traditions of established universities? Or, are the biases and attitudes of established universities being transferred and inscribed into UOIT’s programs and policies? Why have students made the risky choice of attending a new university? What experiences have these pioneering students had in creating a student culture from scratch? This panel will discuss the process through which the university was established and has grown, the roles played by faculty, staff and administration, and the experiences of the first groups of students attending the university. The founding president of UOIT, Dr. Gary Polonsky, will join this panel via Skype to provide his insights into the process of creating the university. Dr. Shirley Van Nuland and Dr. Alyson King will draw on interviews conducted with various founding members of the university community, including the provosts, deans, faculty, staff and administrative personnel, cabinet-level officials, members of the Board of Governors, community members, and students, to discuss the development of a university culture and community.

ORGANIZERS: Spogmai Akseer, Rozalina Omar, Mini Tharakkal, and Anila Zainub (OISE/UT)
spogmai.akseer@utoronto.ca
TITLE: ‘Third Wold’ spaces: Understanding methodological challenges from the perspective of minoritized researchers
As positionally minoritized researchers located in the first world with spatial, geographical and emotional connections to the developing world, we are faced with the dilemma of re-examining our understanding of who ‘we’ are, and our relations to others in our ‘home lands’. Examining our methodologies for conducting research in third world spaces (both spatially and metaphorically), we face various challenges in regards to our positionality, including race, class, gender, religion and sexuality. Some of the questions we raise include: as researchers who share similar backgrounds with our participants, what do we bring to the research? How do we wield ‘authority’ as an ‘insider’ within that context? How do we address accountability in our research? And how do we negotiate the challenges that arise from our experiences as researchers? This session is a call for papers that explore the methodological challenges faced by minoritized researchers in their particular areas of study.

ORGANIZERS: Richard Dominic Wiggers (HEQCO) and Christine Arnold (OISE/UT)
rwiggers@heqco.ca and c.arnold@utoronto.ca
TITLE: Interventions Designed to Promote Student Access and Success in PSE: Do They Actually Work?
Federal and provincial governments and postsecondary institutions across Canada have developed and launched dozens of different interventions designed topromotestudent access, engagement, retention and success at colleges and universities. Many of these interventions are targeted at specific “under-represented” or “at risk” populations (low income, disabled, Aboriginal, first generation PSE, etc.). This panel is national in scope, and will focus on three underrepresented student groups in particular – low income, Aboriginal, adult learners – and will attempt to assess the impact of interventions designed to assist these PSE student populations. After more than a decade of efforts and substantialinvestments of funding by various governments and PSE institutions, it is important that we begin to measure the impact of these interventions and learn what has worked and what could be improved to work better in the future to continue to ensure the broadest possible access to PSE.
Dr. Richard Dominic Wiggers, Higher Education Quality Council of Ontario (HEQCO), “Do Financial Incentives Actually Promote Postsecondary Participation and Success among Low Income Students?”
Christine Helen Arnold, University of Toronto/Ontario Institute for Studies in Education, “How Effective are Student Services Interventions Targeted at Underrepresented Student Groups?”
Kristen Hamilton, Thompson Rivers University, “Measuring Aboriginal Student Engagement and Retention at a Canadian University: Is the NSSSE Worthwhile?”
Janice McKendrick and Dr. Richard Kurial, University of Prince Edward Island, “Exploring Emerging Challenges of Engagement and Student Success for Adult Learners”

ORGANIZERS: Alan Davis (SUNY Empire State College) and Marti Cleveland-Innes (Athabasca)
alan.davis@esc.edu and martic@athabascau.ca
TITLE: Transitions to online teaching and learning: Infrastructure and individual adjustment
The current generation of distance education, blended and online learning, is a response to postmodern, post-Fordist, socioeconomic environments. Off campus education has moved from print-based, independent study to constructivist, collaborative learning through synchronous and asynchronous online classrooms. Most recently, underpinning assumptions of online learning typically revolve around collaborative and engaged learning. Education models in traditional higher education have responded differently to this post-industrial turn. Mainstream higher education considered and adopted new learning technologies and blended learning environments of face-to-face and online learning emerged. Not yet fully understood is the re-conceptualizing, restructuring, and reshaping of the teaching and learning transaction already a part of online, blended and distance education. While good results about blended, online and distance learning are coming in, the how question remains unanswered. Responding to the how question is central to the development of contemporary, relevant and effective models of blended, online and distance learning. Arising from this recent research are questions of theory and practice. Have the collaborative possibilities of online learning changed the essence of the higher education process and experience? Are we seeing a convergence of distance and higher education through the mutual adoption of online learning theory and practice? If we are to fully capitalize on the properties and potential of the Internet and communications technology to enhance the educational experience, then what principles and approaches consistent with both the ideals of a higher educational experience and the capabilities of new technologies need to be developed? These and other emerging questions point to a central issue that requires attention – what should online teaching in higher education look like and how do we facilitate the transition to new models of teaching?

ORGANIZER: Peggy Patterson (Calgary)
mpatters@ucalgary.ca
TITLE: Learning and research without borders in higher education: Experiences of learning, research and collaboration
In many post-secondary institutions, technology is playing an increasingly important role in enabling connections among colleagues around the world through the use of a range of technologies and practices that were unimaginable even 5 years ago. From Skype© chats to graduate courses to research groups to policy making and Google Docs, many areas of academic life have now incorporated various tools and technologies.
In this session, graduate students, researchers, educators, leaders and policy makers will share their knowledge and experiences of how technology has enabled, and enhanced both the quality and opportunity for scholarly activities nationally and globally, while also creating enriched learning and decision-making for those involved. An emphasis on innovative, research-informed practices and live demonstrations will enrich the learning of those participating in this Session. The educational and experiential outcomes for the initiators and recipients will also be highlighted.

ORGANIZER: Kathleen Matheos (Manitoba)
matheos@extended.umanitoba.ca
TITLE: Blended learning in Canadian institutions of higher education
According to an American survey conducted a few years ago, over 80% of higher education institutions in the United States offer courses in a blended format (Arabasz, Boggs & Baker, 2003) and the projection is that in the near future over 80% of all courses in American higher education will be blended. In the words of Gladwell (2000), we have gone over the “tipping point”; blended learning has become an educational epidemic. The three societal forces that have converged (the perfect wave) to drive this epidemic are technology, financial constraints, and quality concerns. The blended approaches to learning that have arisen to address these forces have lead to three major non-contradictory affordances – effectiveness, efficiency, and convenience. The question then is: What is happening in Canadian institutions of higher education with regards to blended learning? The purpose of this organized session is to share case studies, institutional policies and strategies, trends, and issues related to blended learning in Canada. The session will be co-chaired by Dr. Kathleen Matheos, Project Coordinator for Canada’s Collaboration for Online Higher Education and Research (COHERE) and Mr. Duncan Cass-Beggs, Director, Learning Systems and Outcomes, Learning Policy Directorate, Strategic Policy and Research, Human Resources and Skills Development Canada (HRSDC) (to be confirmed)


Call for Paper Proposals


Version française : Dates et thème du congrès 2011 de la SCÉES

The Canadian Society for the Study of Higher Education (CSSHE) will hold its annual conference at The University of New Brunswick in Fredericton, New Brunswick from Monday, May 30 until Wednesday, June 1, 2011 within the Congress of the Humanities and Social Sciences. The CSSHE theme this year is Higher Education across Coasts and Continents.

CSSHE is pleased to invite submissions that explore how post-secondary education is dealing with such issues as the impact of digital technology on research in the humanities and social sciences; the connections that researchers make across disciplinary boundaries and with audiences of various types; and the connections that can be created between researchers and the larger community. Papers addressing other topics regarding such issues as online learning, governance, research, recruitment and student services will also be considered for inclusion in the program.

The Conference Program Chair is Dr. Carol Miles (csshe-scees@carleton.ca) from the Educational Development Centre at Carleton University with Ms. Dragana Polovina-Vukovic (csshe-scees@carleton.ca) also from the Educational Development Centre at Carleton University. The Conference Local Area Coordinator is Dr. Amanda Benjamin (ajb@unb.ca) from the Faculty of Education at The University of New Brunswick.

The Society invites submissions from researchers in higher education and related disciplines such as political science, sociology, history, philosophy, psychology, women’s studies, the sciences, economics, business, administration, and the professions. This conference offers an opportunity for graduate students, educators, policy makers, administrators, activists, and advocates to contribute, reflect, and share their perspectives on higher education and issues around student success. Graduate students, college and university faculty and administrators are encouraged to submit proposals to the 2011 conference. This year’s conference will include keynote presentations, organized paper presentations, individual paper presentations, presentation of the Dissertation Award and the Masters Thesis Award, and joint sessions with other disciplines.

Submission of Paper Proposals

(1) Organized Paper Sessions: Individuals who wish to organize a session for the 2011 conference are asked to submit a session proposal by e-mail by 7 February 2011. The session proposal must include the name of the organizer, e-mail address, institutional affiliation, and a 100 to 200 word description of the session (including a session title).

After undergoing a peer review process to select sessions, a list of session organizers and related sessions will be sent out to the CSSHE membership and posted on the CSSHE website on 14 February 2011. At that time, session organizers will begin accepting proposals for their sessions (to a maximum of 4 presentations). The due date for papers to be submitted to session organizers is 28 February 2011. Session organizers will receive paper proposals, make selections from the proposals and organize the session, and serve as session chairs and discussants at the conference. Potential presenters must submit a title and an extended abstract of their paper (not to exceed 1500 words) to the appropriate session organizer directly. Organizers are strongly encouraged to include at least one student paper presentation in their sessions.

In order to present an organized session at the conference, the presenters must be a member in good standing of CSSHE. Membership applications can be found online at the CSSHE Web site.

(2) Individual Papers: Proposals for research, conceptual, or policy paper presentations should include (a) a proposal, not to exceed 1500 words and (b) contact information. The proposal should indicate the background, theoretical framework, research design and key expected findings (where appropriate), conclusions and significance of the study. Proposals are due on 28 February 2011. Individual paper proposals will be peer reviewed.

In order to present a research paper at the conference, the presenters must be a member in good standing of CSSHE. Membership applications can be found online at the CSSHE Web site.

Submission of Poster Proposals

Individuals who wish to present a poster at the 2011 conference are asked to submit a proposal by e-mail by 7 March 2011. The proposal must include the name of the organizer, contact information including an e-mail address, institutional affiliation, and a 200-350 word description of the poster (including a session title). Poster proposals will be peer reviewed.

In order to present a poster at the conference, the presenters must be a member in good standing of CSSHE. Membership applications can be found online at the CSSHE Web site.

Please forward proposals by email to:

Carol Miles
Educational Development Centre
Carleton University

Email: csshe-scees@carleton.ca

Version française : Dates et thème du congrès 2011 de la SCÉES